The Simple Beauty of the Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

I’ve photographed the dandelion for a number of years now every mid to late spring. Where I walk there are literally thousands upon thousands clustered in tight numbers. I love the simplicity and delicate nature of the seed carrier. One blow … making a child-like wish and they are gone on the wind.

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Dandelions are thought to have evolved around 30 million years ago in Eurasia and have been used as a herb, medicine and a food for thousands of years.

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The deep yellow petals before lawns where popular gardeners weeded out the grass to make way for the dandelions. Humans of the 20th century decided that the dandelion was a weed.

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The yellow blossom matures into a fluffy delicate puff ball of seeds. The seeds are carried on the wind like tiny parachutes and can travel great distances.

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Each seed is attached to a bundle of approximately 100 feathery bristles, these are called pappus. Most seeds more than likely land within two metres of the parent flower, however if the weather is windy and dry it’s possible that some will travel a kilometer or more.

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Recognition for my work

It’s always nice to have recognition for your work.

Viewbug’s staff, guest and resident judges look at the entries of the contests as well as all the photos uploaded to the community to choose their favorite photos and award them.

At ViewBug, you can win contests as well as receive awards on your photos. It is a great honor to be chosen as your photo is chosen among many others and it is selected based on creativity, originality, composition and overall quality.

There are no specific numbers of awards given, the judges have sole discretion about this.

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Won Staff Winter Selection 2015 – December, 2015

Winter in a Country Park

I travel through Poolsbrook Country Park on my way to work in the week, I see all the seasons throughout the year. The sunsets, the sunrises, the snow, the iced over lake and the burnt, dry grass of summer… all of them.

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This series is shot entirely in natural light over a number of years with different cameras and lenses. Due to work and family commitments it is very hard to get time out to photograph for myself so I tend to photograph while walking to my destinations.

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I have a very small window of time to photograph in the park during my walk to work, I would say around 15 to 20 minutes in total. This is dependent on the weather and the clarity of the sunrise. Results are very often varied but rarely do I come out without getting at least half a dozen shots that I’m happy with.

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It’s not uncommon to see the lake frozen mid-winter, the lake becoming a “landing pad” for the wild birds that breed and live there. Towards the end of Winter when the temperature starts to rise eerie mist is seen floating off the pond, very often onto the stretch of road that runs by the park. Most of the trees have no leaves at this time except for a few perennials.

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Although the park is not at first viewing aesthetically pleasing due to electric cables and pylons I’m a big believer in making the best of what you have to work with and decided long ago to make the pylons a fixture in the pictures i shoot at the park. Composed with care the pylons can look not too much out of place and adds to the dramatic skies that are often seen over the skyline at sunrise.

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Frost and Berries go well together
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The frosticles are beautiful

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